Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of


Download 57.24 Kb.
NamePlease call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of
A typeDocumentation
manual-guide.com > manual > Documentation
Newborn Information
Important Reminders

  • Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of age. The first visit is usually scheduled with one of the Nurse Practitioners.




  • Notify your insurance company of the birth of your child immediately. Specify your child’s Primary Care Provider (PCP).




  • Use the Newborn Check list as a guide for your first visit to the office




  • Go to the forms part of the web site and print out the Patient Information Sheet, the Financial Policy, and the Family and Medical History form. These need to be completed and given to the front desk when you check in.


Checklist for Parents of Newborns
Before you leave the hospital obtain the following information to bring to the first visit:


  • Discharge Weight _____________________




  • Results of any lab test performed




  • Results of Bilirubin tests, if done




  • Were Blood Types done for Mom and Baby? If so, keep a record for yourself



The State of Georgia is now requiring a hearing screen to be done on all newborns before discharge.


  • Please bring the hearing screen report to the first visit


PKU Metabolic Screening Test – this is done on all babies for several metabolic diseases which are preventable if treated early. This test will be done in the hospital before discharge. If it is done before the baby is 24 hours old, it will need to be repeated at their first visit in the office.


  • Record date and time test was done ___________________________



Please call the office and schedule the following appointments:


  • Newborn visit in approximately 7-10 days with our Nurse Practitioners

  • Visit # 2 with Nurse Practitioner or Physician at approximately 1 month of age

  • Visit # 3 with Nurse Practitioner or Physician at approximately 2 months of age


Call your insurance company or your Human Resource Department to add your baby to the policy


  • Record date call was made




  • Remember to bring the insurance card to every visit


Complete forms included with this book to bring to your first visit


  • New Patient Information




  • Family History


If you would like to print out this form go to the forms section of the web-site.

Newborn Instructions

Congratulations on your new baby! This is an exciting and rewarding time for you as new parents to watch your baby grow and develop. As new parents, there are many common problems and questions which arise that will be upsetting and puzzling to you. As long as your baby is well-loved, well-fed, warm, and comfortable, he won’t mind that you are less than an expert. Loving your child, common sense, and the ability to adapt to particular situations are the keys to successful child-rearing.
Supplemental Newborn Screening

The State of Georgia screens for the following metabolic diseases as well as for Sickle Cell Disorders:

Phenylketonuria

Congenital Hypothyroidism

Maple Syrup Urine Disease

Galactosemia

Tyrosinemia

Homocystinuria

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

Biotinidase Deficiency

Medium-Chain Acyl-CoADehydrogenase Deficiency

Northside Hospital will offer you the opportunity to have your child screened for additional disorders not included in the standard screen. We consider these screens to be important since they will be screening for approximately 40 different disorders. There is an additional charge for these tests and the hospital will discuss this with you.


Babies are Babies

Most babies sneeze, burp, have hiccups, pass gas, and cough. Many grunt and strain with stools. They may occasionally look cross-eyed. Sneezing is the only way in which a baby can clear his nose of mucus or milk. Hiccups are little spasms of the diaphragm muscle and are harmless. Coughing is a baby’s way of clearing his throat. Crying is his way of saying “I’m hungry, I’m wet, I’m thirsty, I want to turn over, I’m too hot, I’m too cold, I have a stomachache, or I’m bored”. You will gradually learn to know what your baby means. They just may need to suck, or be cuddled, or they may be expressing themselves.
Breast Feeding

The choice of whether to breast or bottle feed is up to you. Whichever you choose, we will try to help support you in maintaining the best possible care of your infant. We strongly encourage breast feeding as this is obviously the ideal situation for your baby. Even if you are returning to work and cannot breast feed your baby for more than a few weeks, it is still well worth the time involved. An adequate milk supply may take a few days to get established. We believe in “demand feedings” especially until your milk supply is established but babies generally do not need to feed more than every 2 hours. If your baby is sleeping longer than 3-4 hours during the day, it is probably a good idea to awaken them to feed. This may help them learn the difference between day and night.


Guidelines for Breastfeeding Women:

Contact your doctor if you do not see the following





First 8 hours

8 – 24 hours

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6 on

Milk Supply

You may be able to express a few drops of milk

Milk should come in between the 2nd and 4th days.

Milk should be in. Breasts may be firm or leak milk

Breasts should feel softer after eating

Baby’s Activity

Baby is usually wide awake in the 1st hour of life. Put to breast within ½ hour of birth

Wake your baby. Babies may not awaken on their own to feed.

Baby should be more cooperative and less sleepy

Look for early feeding cues; rooting, lip smacking, hands to face. Note that baby swallows regularly while nursing.

Baby should appear satisfied after feedings

Feeding Routine

Baby may go into deep sleep 2 – 4 hours after birth

Feed your baby every

1 ½ hours to 3 hours as often as wanted

Feedings should be at least 8 – 10 per day

May go longer interval, up to 5 hours between feedings (in a 24 hour interval)

Breastfeeding

Baby will wake up and be alert and responsive for several more hours after the initial deep sleep

Nurse at both breasts as long as baby is actively sucking and Mother is comfortable

Try to nurse on both sides at each feeding, aiming for 10-15 minutes each side. Expect some nipple tenderness

Consider hand expressing a few drops of milk to soften the nipple if the breast is too firm for the baby to latch on

Nurse at least 10 – 15 minutes on each side, every 2 – 3 hours for the first few months of life

Mother’s nipple tenderness is improved or gone

Baby’s Urine Output




Baby must have a least 1 wet diaper in the first 24 hours

Baby should have at least 1 wet diaper every 8 hours

Wet diapers should increase to 4 – 6 in 24 hours

Baby’s urine should be light yellow

Baby should have 6 – 8 wet diapers per day of colorless or light yellow urine



Baby’s Stools




Baby should have a black-green stool (meconium stool)

Baby may have a second very dark meconium stool

Baby’s stools should be changing from black-green to yellow

Baby should have 3 – 4 yellow seedy stools per day

The number of stools may slowly decrease after 4-6 weeks



Breast Pumps

Breast Pumps are available for expressing and storing milk. Pumps may be manually operated, battery-operated, or electrical (plug-in-type). Generally, electrical pumps produce the best pumping action. If you use a pump, buy or rent one that’s designed for easy cleaning.

Selected Breast Pumps available commercially:

  1. Evenflo Deluxe Breast Pump (Evenflo Products). Available at retail stores or at http://www.evenflo.com/

  2. Medela electric pumps – available at http://www.medela.com/ - Northside Hospital Lactation (404-303-3329) also sells and rents Medela

  3. Ameda Egnell breast pumps – available at http://www.amedababy.com/


Bottle Feeding
Infant formula will provide all calories, minerals and vitamins your child will need for normal growth. It’s preferable to use a concentrated liquid or powder formula to which water is added as directed. Water will add fluoride to your infant formula.
You do not need to sterilize bottles, nipples, or water (unless you have well water). You may wash bottles and nipples in hot tap water with detergent or use your dishwasher. Always hold the baby, never prop the bottle in bed or leave the baby unattended while feeding. Initial feeding may be as little as 1 ounce or up to 3 ounces. Give the amount that seems to satisfy your baby in 20 – 30 minutes.
Burping

Burping your baby helps remove swallowed air. To burp your baby, hold him or her upright over your shoulder, and gently pat or rub the back. Another way is to place the baby face down across your lap and gently rub the back, or you can sit the baby on your lap, leaning slightly forward, with your hand supporting the chest. Sometimes, a baby will not be able to burp. Do not try to force the baby to burp if the first few attempts are not successful. Don’t be alarmed if your baby spits up a small amount when being burped. Don’t stop feeding a hungry baby to burp him.
Sterilization

It is not necessary to sterilize bottles or nipples if they are carefully washed and thoroughly rinsed. A dishwasher is quite satisfactory. You do no need to boil city water. If you use well water; it should be boiled.
Schedule

Feeding schedules should remain flexible allowing the baby to eat when he becomes hungry. Most commonly this occurs ever 2 ½ to 4 hours. Since it takes at least two hours for the infants stomach to empty, crying less than 2 hours after the last feeding is seldom due to hunger. If he sleeps beyond 4 hours between feedings during the day, he may be awakened to feed, whereas after 10:00 PM the infant should be allowed to waken you before feeding. Teach your baby early that nighttime is for sleeping.
Solids

For the first 4 – 6 months of life, your baby gets all the nutrients he needs to grow from breast milk or formula. The idea that solids help your baby sleep through the night is basically a myth. Solids given too early can cause gas, diarrhea, allergies, etc. Specific feeding instructions are individualized for each child as they approach the 4 – 7 month age. Occasionally cereal feedings may be necessary before 4 months of age; this will be discussed on an individual basis.


Vitamins and Fluoride

Babies 2 months and older who are breast feeding or until they are taking 17 ounces of prepared formula need supplements of Vitamin D. We recommend ½ dropper of PolyViSol.

If your child is not receiving any tap water, after 6 months of age, he/she will need a fluoride supplement.
Bowel Movements

Stools of newborn babies vary in size, color, consistency, and frequency. Most normal stools are semi liquid, “seedy” and are yellowish or greenish. Bowel movements may occur as often as with every feeding or as infrequently as every 3 to 5 days. Even though the baby may strain, unless the stool is hard and pellet-like, it is not constipation. It is perfectly normal for a baby to pull his legs up grunting and crying in order to have a bowel movement. This is his way of pushing the stool along.
Bathing

A sponge bathing technique should be used in bathing until the umbilical cord has fallen off and the navel area healed. You may then begin with tub baths. Mild soaps (Dove, Johnson’s Baby Wash, Baby Magic soap, etc.) are excellent for bathing infants. Baby shampoos are helpful in washing the hair since most will not burn the eyes. You may wash your infant’s face with the shampoo or with soap and water. Most infant bath soaps will not irritate eyes. Soap and water or commercial baby wipes are satisfactory in bathing the diaper area. However, if redness or irritation in diaper area develops discontinue the wipes. There is no need for soap at each diaper change. Creams, lotions, or oils are not necessary on your infant’s skin unless excessive dryness is present. Hypo allergenic lotion can be used after a bath. Powders may be dangerous if ingested or inhaled and should not be used routinely. Stool may be cleaned from female genitals with water or baby wipes.
Cord

The umbilical cord should be cleaned using a cotton swab or cotton ball saturated with alcohol 4 times daily until it falls off. Make sure you lift the cord so you can clean around it completely. Some oozing and bleeding from the cord is normal. If the cord becomes moist from bathing or urine, air dry or use a blow dryer in a low setting to gently dry it off; report any inflammation, persistent bleeding, or odor.

Circumcision

Keep the circumcision area clean with plain warm water. Until it has completely healed, coat with Vaseline at each diaper change; report any redness or excessive swelling.
Diaper Rash

Most babies may develop, at some time, an irritation or redness in the diaper area. When this occurs change your baby’s diaper as soon as possible after each stool and as often as possible after wetting. After cleaning the diaper area, pat dry and apply Vaseline, A & D ointment, or Desitin. If the diaper rash does not improve in 5- 7 days, notify the office.
Vaginal Discharge

A sticky, white vaginal discharge is common in the newborn female infant. There may be some vaginal bleeding noted within the first few days of life due to withdrawal of maternal estrogen. This is a normal occurrence. Likewise a baby’s breasts may be swollen for a few weeks (even in males).
Environment

The temperature of the baby’s room is right if it feels comfortable to an adult. Dress the baby accordingly, as you would yourself. Do not overdress your baby. The best position for sleeping is on the baby’s back. The mattress should be firm and level, and no pillow should be used. Fresh air is fine for a new baby. An infant may go out at any age, but exposing the baby to direct sun rays is not advisable. No smoking in the same room or automobile with your baby.
Safety

Your baby should always ride in an approved car seat that has been properly installed in the back seat. Infants up to twelve months and/or 20 pounds should be in an infant or convertible seat facing the rear of the car. Children 12 months to 4 years and/or 40 pounds should be in a convertible seat. Keep children in toddler seat as long as they will fit. For more detailed information on car seat safety, please consult these web sites: www.nhtsa.dot.gov, http://safekids.com/, http://www.safety.com. www.choa.org/safety/buckleup
Recommendations to Help Your Baby Relax

  • Speak softly before touching your baby

  • Position your baby on his/her tummy (when not sleeping)

  • Swaddle your baby

  • Protect your baby from light and noise

  • Give your baby a pacifier; let him/her suck their fingers

  • Calm you baby with your hand over his/her body, back of head, and soles of their feet

  • Hold and rock your baby

  • Play soothing music

  • Give your baby only one toy/picture at a time

  • Pat your baby

  • Stroke your baby


Fever

If your infant or child has a fever, call our office if:

  • An infant under 2 months of age has a rectal temperature either over 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C) or under 97.5 degrees F (36.5 degrees C)

  • Any child has a temperature over 104 degrees F (39.5 degrees C)

  • Any child’s fever persists longer than 3 days

  • Any child can’t be comforted, cries when moved, or is unusually quiet with a high fever

  • Any child with difficulty breathing

  • Any child has a convulsion or seizure



Taking Your Child’s Temperature


Rectal Temperature

Normal 99.6 degrees F (36.6 degrees C)

Range of Normal:

98 degrees F (36.6 degrees C)

to 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C)



  1. Lubricate silver bulb end of a rectal thermometer with K-Y jelly

  2. Lay infant flat on his or her stomach and spread buttocks so anus (lower opening of the digestive tract) is easily seen

  3. Hold thermometer between thumb and index finger so that your palm can rest on the buttocks. Slowly and gently insert thermometer 2 centimeters (slightly less than an inch) into the anus. The silver tip will no longer be seen

  4. Hold thermometer carefully in place for 1 – 2 minutes (most digital thermometers will beep when complete). Hold infant still with other hand.

  5. Remove thermometer

  6. Read degree of temperature


We recommend taking rectal temperatures in infants.

Please note:

We have found tympanic (ear) thermometers are not very reliable for infants and small children.

We do not recommend the use of mercury thermometers
IMMUNIZATION SCHEDULES

Your baby will require certain immunizations for protection against childhood diseases. North Atlanta Pediatric Associates is committed to immunizing all infants with vaccines required by the state of Georgia, if your child has no medical contraindications. We will require adherence to the following schedule of immunizations. Please note, new immunizations are being developed and may be added to this schedule when available.



AGE

VACCINES

* DENOTES OPTIONAL VACCINE

At Birth

Hepatitis B

2 MONTH

DTaP

IPV

HIB/HEP

*PREVNAR

*ROTATEQ




4 MONTH

DTaP

IPV

HIB/HEP

*PREVNAR

*ROTATEQ




6 MONTH

DTaP

*PREVNAR

*ROTATEQ

9 MONTH




1 YEAR

MMR/VARIVAX **Must be 1 year

HIB/HEP

*PREVNAR

*HEP A **must be 1 year

18 MONTH

DTaP

IPV

*HEP A – MUST BE 6 MONTH INTERVAL FROM 1ST DOSE

2 YEAR

HEP A if 2 doses not completed

4 YEAR

All shots listed on 5 year visit may be given @ 4 year visit

**must be at least 4 years old

5 YEAR

DTaP

IPV

MMR

11YEAR

Td aP

*MENACTRA/MENINGOCCAL CONJUGATE


CHEKUP SCHEDULE

These are the ages that we typically do checkups. Contact the office as soon as possible after the birth of your child to schedule your newborn, one-month, and two-month checkups. Please call at least two to three months in advance to schedule routine physicals. We recommend annual checkups on all children two years and older.

Newborn 1 month 2 month 4 month

6 month 9 month 12 month 18 month

Annual checkups for ages 2 years and up
HELPFUL READING

What to Expect the First Year by Arlene Eisenberg

Infants and Mothers by Dr. T. Berry Brazelton

Moms on Call, basic baby and toddler care by Jennifer Walker, RN and Laura Hunter, LPN (Both are pediatric nurses in our office)

The Happiest Baby on the Block by Dr. Harvey Karp

The First Twelve Months of Life by Frank Caplan

Womanly Art of Breast-Feeding by La Leche League

Caring for Your Baby and Young Child by Steven P. Shelov, M.D.

Caring for Your Baby and Young Child: Birth to Age 5 American Academy of Pediatrics

Solve Your Child’s Sleep Problems by Richard Ferber

Share in:

Related:

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconD. “Make an appointment if you note any hard lumps directly on the...

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconThe cris application is a Patient based information system, and it...

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconAppointment Cancellation Policy Please provide 24 hours notice if...

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconA randomized clinical trial of 4 months Rifampin vs. 9 months Isoniazid

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconCall Forwarding, Call Waiting & Call Holding, and Voice Mail Service etc

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconExpiresActive on ExpiresDefault "access plus 1 month" ExpiresByType...

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconOperator: Good day everyone and welcome to the ibm sales Deep Dive...

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconCall to Order and Roll Call of Chapters

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconSet call options When you first sign in to Lync, you’ll be guided...

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconCall me Marie. (sense 1) I can always call

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconAttested appointment (csc)

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconFor Appointment of Faculty/ Assistant at Rseti

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconFire and aviation management state office/regional office (soro)

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconSkills and concepts part I: Appointment Reminder Cards

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconUnit 3 Meteorology Suggested Time: 5 Weeks

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconTop Rated Baby Monitors

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconShopping Checklist for baby and mummy

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconThe first few weeks of your Scentsy business can really set the pace for your future

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconAlpha Mom Ultimate Baby Registry

Please call the office as soon as possible to make an appointment for your baby’s first three well checkups at 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month of age, and 2 months of iconPrenatal Development, Birth, and the Newborn Baby




manual


When copying material provide a link © 2017
contacts
manual-guide.com
search