Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access


Download 211.73 Kb.
NameImage description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access
page1/5
A typeScript
manual-guide.com > manual > Script
  1   2   3   4   5
Front cover:

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access.

For and by people with disability

Starecase

Issue 2 – still spring, 2013

Headlines – not just another statistic

Milly Parker on having an ABI

Its our movement

Taking back the disability rights movement

All about contracts – how to avoid getting ripped off

Whatever happened to Kyla Puhle?

The path to inclusion

A liar and a fake

PLUS

Surviving disability – the worst case scenario survival guide to disability

Produced at spasmodic intervals within a miniscule budget

Page 2

THIS MONTH

4 Its Our Movement

Let’s take it back...power, democracy and the disability rights movement

7 Whats in a Peak?

January J talks about marginalisation

8 Not Just Another Statistic

Milly tells her story

11 The Incubator

A Story

12 What to Do When You’re

Stuck

The worst case scenario guide to disability

15 Ticking All The Boxes

Tom and voting in Australia

16 Contracts

What to do when you’re making a contract

22 Comply or Die

January on being sick - and compliant

24 Whatever Happened to Kyla Puhle?

Invisibility amongst women at the margins of personhood

26 DIY Paper Plane

How to recycle your outdated DisabilityCare Australia literature

28 A Liar and a Fake

Gary Kerridge tells us about being a liar and a fake - who happens to be Deaf

32 The Path to Inclusion

Samantha Jenkinson on segregation, isolation and institutions

39 A Drummer’s Story

Andrew Hewitt and TRAP

Page 3

From the Green Chair

Great response from people with disability around Australia.

I should point out that this publication isn’t a
professionally produced marvel of technology and professionalism. Its a one person band with no funding, a Facebook window open on one side, Indesign on the other, and a marvellous group of random online contributors who are tirelessly
writing and contributing for your reading pleasure.

We’ve had some marvellous feedback and a bunch of letters. My favourite comes from Stuart Mawbey, in response to Craig Wallace’s article ‘What
happened to you?’ It reads (partially) as follows -

‘I reply to the question about my withered arm, saying...‘I got stuck in the dryer and it shrank’...

Great magazine. I would have liked “GIMP” as a title but that’s just me.

Gimpily yours with respect, Stuart.

We also received some feedback about accessibility from Amber, a bunch of outraged complaints from some parents, an email from a web based
disability mag called ‘whats up in disability’ (stay tuned for more info) and an email from a Mr. Leung Wing Lok, the credit officer of Hang Seng Bank of (Hong Kong) detailing ‘a lucrative business proposal of mutual interest to share with you DETAIL OF THE PROPOSAL In June, 2001.’

Keep the responses coming. We need content - this isn’t my magazine, or a magazine that belongs to any organisation. Its your magazine, and unless you’re part of it, its just another bunch of words. Email us at starecasenews@gmail.com.

- Pretzel

Editors In Chief

A bunch of people with disability

Associate Editors

A bunch of people with disability

Contributing Writer

Situation Vacant

Contributing Writer

Situation Vacant

Art Director

Situation Vacant

Cartoonist

The fabulous Dave Lupton

Circulation Officer

Situation Vacant

Sales Officer

Situation Vacant

To apply for any of the above

positions, write to

starecasenews@gmail.com

Page 3

IT’s our movement - lets take it back. A new day is dawning for disability rights

T he last few days have seen mixed emotions as the new Government takes power in Canberra. The victors are jubilant while others are angry or confused. Yet what is beyond doubt is that we are a democracy. We choose our leaders and hold them to account. If they get arrogant or lazy we ditch them. Democracy can throw up moments which crystallise the public mood in those moments. The defeat of a candidate who didn’t know his own policy in Greenway, the disendorsement of a bully in Hotham and that result everyone’s talking about in Indi. In Syria we see the results of a voiceless people as a government lobs poison at its own.

Australia is lucky that we employ the government. And all across Australia in civil society - in the clubs, the AMA, ACOSS, the NRMA,

business

councils, trade unions,

professional associations, local councils, farmers groups, state and

territory

parliaments and in sporting codes - people can join, vote and elect those who they want to represent them. Even the ALP is moving its leadership contests out of the shadows.

And yet somehow in disability, where we most need a voice of our own, it’s all gone wrong. Almost everyone can vote for who represents them except people with disability ourselves:

• Service providers can join and vote for a funded

organisation, National Disability Services, which

represents them;

• Disability support

workers can vote for organisers in unions; and

• Carers can vote for Board members in a funded

organisation which represents them.

For us, the Australian Federation of Disability Organisations is the body

officially recognised as “the primary national voice to Government that fully

represents the interests of all people with disability across Australia”. You heard it right. “Primary voice”. “Fully

represents”. “All people”. It’s got some good hard working people in it. Genuine people. People I respect. But ordinary people with disability cannot stand for or directly vote for its board or decide who leads. Alone, out of all the business groups, trades, professions, movements, unions and causes, people with disabilities have no way of directly electing the

leaders of the body that

government appointed to

represent us. That’s not right, it’s not fair, it’s paternalism and worst of all, it’s not working. Even the organisational

members of AFDO are voting with their feet. Some people haven’t even heard of it.

This movement belongs to us and it’s time we took it back, with a directly elected

professional peak body

recognised by government that’s accountable to all of us. That holds power at the will of us, not imposed by government. That anyone with a disability can join, vote for and

participate in. That’s high

profile and known. We need a body capable of harnessing the voice we now hold in the

public square. That can grasp the momentum and goodwill we have following the

introduction of the NDIS and make us run, wheel and shuffle like mad towards our future.

This is our moment. We have become the 98%, yet we still behave like we’re in the attic with the 2%. But it doesn’t have to be like this. We

dominated the public square for an entire year in 1981, got wheelchair taxi subsidies and a PADP scheme, stopped a major airline from discriminating against us, made entire towns and cities change planning, freed people from institutions, shook up the ABC and wrote a Disability Discrimination Act. We were able to be all these things and do all these things because people stepped up. Leaders who are known and revered. Like Joan Hume, Graeme Innes, John Moxon, Sue Salthouse, Ian Cooper, Christopher Newell, Robert Farley, Hazel Freed and Annie McDonald. Yet somehow we never took the next step. We never found a democratic

culture. Is it any wonder we have so few people with

disability in the Parliament? And where are our Ministers for disability with a disability? Why aren’t the peaks a pathway for people to get into politics as they are for women, for

unionists, for business?

This last week saw a group of advocates come together in Canberra to discuss where it’s going wrong and how to fix it. These were exhausting

discussions amongst people of goodwill trapped inside

structures shaped by history rather than choice. Much of the two days was about what

government might do to us, for us or be saying about us. Instead of talking about what others do, it’s time we took the steering wheel.

All week I heard people

frustrated by our lack of unity. They were right. Yet some also said that change is

impossible. They were wrong. Some believe we have

difference that can’t be solved. That we are defined solely by our disability rather than our life stories, our genders, our common barriers and a lack of access to jobs, housing,

relationships and resources within a world that

withholds its respect. And there is no denying some truths in all of this and it seems hard. Exhausting. But in throes of despair, I see the awesome stuff we CAN still do. And none of it has anything to do with what some doctor diagnosed us with. The

campaign about Myer. The Divas busting a gut to develop a book of punchy stories in a single day to bring to Premiers at COAG. The people who let MP’s into their kitchens and told their stories yet again. Those who told harrowing truths to the Productivity Commission knowing they would be repeated around the country. The gutsy YDAS team who stopped trams in the centre of Melbourne at peak hour and the bloggers like Carly Findlay who rewrite the ableist

narrative of the world one post at a time. The whirl of wonder that is Stella Young and ABC Ramp Up that’s opened up a conversation in our community and got disability out of the box and onto Q&A. This Starecase magazine - dreamed out of nothing, done for free by people with no time. If we can do all these things then YES we can control our voice if we decide to. One that’s filled with muscle and shows we can represent ourselves. A tuned up engine for change that is:

• modern, sharp as a tack and pushing out with social media, crowdfunding and the 24 hour opinion cycle;

• gutsy and never accepts

comfortable mediocrity,

ineffectual advocacy or tea and sympathy;

• democratic, muscular and able to attract the sharpest voices. Voices with ambition - fighting to be part of what we are making who will wind up in Federal Parliament;

• respected and setting a high tone through probity, integrity and honesty;

• able to speak with one voice on great public issues that need weight of numbers yet champion voices of others in their own fields, especially campaigners for women, Deaf Australians, blind citizens and youth who blaze a trail for all of us; and

• inclusive enough to allow the unfiltered voices of people with intellectual disability to come through, along the lines of People First in NZ or the Our Voice initiative. If you want change, if you support a better voice for disability, if you have ideas - then join facebook.com/wewantchangedisability

It’s about democracy so we’ll capture the discussions - even the ones we mightn’t agree with - and send them direct to the Minister for Social Services. There are

millions of us and nothing can stand in the way of our voice unless we let it.

Craig Wallace is the President of People with Disability Australia.

Cartoon - Three disabled people are sitting at the end of a large conference table. They represent a mixture of impairment, gender and cultural diversity. At the other end of the table are several men and women wearing business suits. Behind them is a white board on which a black male is writing ‘Consultation on ecotowns. Cheap, good quality …’. One of the business men is carrying a tray on which are several cups and saucers. He is saying to his colleagues whilst gesturing down the table at the disabled participants: "“Do you think they take sugar?!”"

Page 7

WHAT’S IN A PEAK? JANUARY J GETS THE CONVERSATION UP AND RUNNING

hat should a peak body, a
disabled person’s
organisation,
representing ALL people with disabilities look like?

It should include voting for our representatives, but
voting isn’t perfect and some of us are hard-pressed to compete that way. It needs to take that into account too.

It needs to reach out
specifically to groups that are historically disadvantaged: indigenous peoples, women, those with
non-English speaking
backgrounds, the homeless, those living in rural and remote Australia.

It needs to reach out to disability groups that are usually not well represented in groups like this: those with intellectual disabilities, those with psychiatric disabilities, those who are institutionalised, the deaf blind, those with complex communication needs, and those who are
bedridden and housebound.

People whose disabilities make it difficult for them to participate in disabled people’s organisations need special attention: Those who need extra time to take in and think about information, those who need extra time to express their thoughts and ideas, those who require
information in specialised
formats, those whose
disability makes it hard for them to access the internet or other means of
communication. We need to reach out to disability
superstars - the people like Peter Gibilisco who have PhDs in this stuff but whose
disabilities make it hard for them to contribute. I’m sure there are more superstars I just don’t know about.

We need to decide how we will deal with certain types of members respectfully and usefully - those who are
disabled by the “usual”
diseases of ageing, and those who wish to join on behalf of a severely disabled family member. We need to decide ahead of time how this will be handled, paying special attention to making sure that those who are the least able to speak for themselves are still heard amongst the din. We need to reach out to people who don’t usually join disabled people’s
organisations - those who are disabled by chronic illness but never identify as “disabled” because to them it feels too much like giving up. Those who think they have nothing to say, or think we have
nothing to say to them.

Just imagine - if all of us could listen to each other even when it was scary. If all of us could trust that others would listen when we said something. If all of us could communicate with each other and empower the best of us, we could move mountains.

- January J

Page 8 – Not just another statistic

Image description – Milly Parker kissing at the camera

T here comes a point in many
relationships when the couple realise that they’ve spent more time with their significant other than they have with their
family of origin.

It’s a milestone that can unnerve people who struggle with the emotional
consequences of change.

I’ve achieved a milestone of sorts as well. It also involves a relationship. In this case it is the passing of my original self to the person I became in 1992. In September of that year, at the age of 21, I was involved in a horrific car accident. The result was an Acquired Brain Injury that changed my life more profoundly than if I had left home to cohabit with another person.
  1   2   3   4   5

Share in:

Related:

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconExpiresActive on ExpiresDefault "access plus 1 month" ExpiresByType...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconAbstract : The author presents a biogenetic structural theory of...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconLike the Fingers of the Hand: Thinking the Human in the Texture of...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconAvaya™ Universal Access Phone Status

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconUniversal Architecture Description Framework

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconA kaingin Boy and decs-pept alumnus turned an Outstanding Teacher...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconAs titles roll, hip city music plays in the background, the camera...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconRed, a Babylonian word, the generic name for man, having the same...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconIt is a work of art created by hand and printed by hand, either by...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconThe major components of the system are the vacuum pump, the compressor,...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconDescription of fix: Ignore the check of the schedule access when...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconThroughout our history the emergency seems always to have found the...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconBen Shaw closed in on the man-o’-war. The immense 84-gun ship left...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconDream Man [1] Kristen Ashley Kristen Ashley (2012) Gwendolyn Kidd...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconMemoirs of an anarchist, enemy of the people, man who shot frick,...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconSymbols Used in This Publication I

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconDisk image Editor Nigel Parker Spell Checking Peter Badrick Alex...

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access icon3. terms and symbols used in the guide 13

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access icon1. safety terms and symbols

Image description: The hand of a young man with hypermobility, fingers stretched up in a way others cannot achieve. The universal symbols for access iconAttractions key to Symbols




manual


When copying material provide a link © 2017
contacts
manual-guide.com
search