Guidelines vesd 2007 2008


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Ask the fiction or nonfiction question for Student Responses Levels 14-24.

Check the question asked.

Fiction: What was the most important thing that happened in the story and why is it important?

Or

Nonfiction: What did you learn from this book and why is it important to know?



DRA2 Comprehension Rubric

VESD Adaptation for Levels 28-40



Name _______________________________________ Date__________________
Grade __________________ Teacher _______________________________


Comprehension Scores

Below

6 7 8 9

Approaching

10 11 12 13 14 15

Proficient

16 17 18 19 20 21

Advanced

22 23 24

Sequence of Events/

Facts

(Retelling/Summary)

 Includes 1 or 2 ideas/facts/events

in own language and/or copied text

 Includes at least 3-4 ideas/facts/events, some in random order (partial)

 Includes 5+ important ideas/facts/events in sequence

 Includes all of the important events in sequence

Characters/Animals/

Objects (nouns)


 Refers to nouns using general pronouns

(he, she, it, they)

 Refers to nouns using generic names (boy, girl, dog)

 Refers to most nouns by name

 Refers to all nouns by name

Details/Vocabulary

 Includes 1-2 or no important details/ vocabulary from text

 Includes 3-4 important details/

vocabulary

 Includes 5+ important details/ vocabulary

 Includes all important details/

vocabulary

Literal Comprehension

 Incorrect information, limited understanding

 Responds with some misinterpretation; uses some understanding of key concepts

 Responds with no misinterpretation; understands key concepts

 Responds with interpretation that reflects higher level thinking

Interpretation/Student

Responses

 Little or no understanding of important text implications

 Partial understanding of important text; little or nor detail

 Understands important text and has relevant supporting details

 Higher level understanding of important text implications; includes supporting rationale

Reflection

See questions below or questions in the DRA2 student booklet


 Gives an unrelated response or no response

 Gives a limited response and/or a general reason

 Gives a specific event/fact/action and a relevant reason

 Gives a specific event/fact/action and a relevant reason that reflects higher level thinking

Ask the fiction or nonfiction question for Student Responses Levels 28-40.

Check the question asked.

Fiction: What was the most important thing that happened in the story and why is it important?

Or
Nonfiction: What did you learn from this book and why is it important to know?


Student Form for Literal Comprehension, Interpretation and Reflection

Original DRA: Levels 28-40

Student Name ____________________________ Date _________________
Teacher _________________________________ Grade ________________

Literal Comprehension:
List 3 things you know about the main character(s), animal(s) or object(s).


  1. _____________________________________________________________




  1. _____________________________________________________________




  1. _____________________________________________________________



Interpretation:
What do you think the author is trying to tell you in this story?

Reflection:
Fiction: What was the most important thing that happened in the story and why is it important?

Nonfiction: What did you learn from this book and why is it important to know?

Informal Running Record Form

Name: _________________________ Teacher ________________ Date ________
Grading Period: 1A (Initial Assessment) Trimester - 1 2 3


E = error SC = Self Corrections

M = Meaning S = Structure V = Visual

Page





E


SC

Information/Cues

Used

E

SC

M S V

M S V




















Page





E


SC

Information/Cues

Used

E

SC

M S V

M S V




















Steps to Analyze a Running Record

When you are ready to analyze a running record, you will need to use the DRA small RR Form (p. 25) and staple or lay it to the right side of the reading passage. Fill in the columns to the right of the lines of text the student read and you have marked.

Begin by looking at any error the student has made in the first line. Mark the number of errors made in the first column to the right of the line. If the student self corrected any of these errors, mark the number of self-corrections in the second column to the right of the line.

Next determine whether the errors and self-corrections were made as a result of meaning, structure, or visual cueing. For a description of each of these cues, review the explanations provided below and on p. 28. Write MSV in each column for each error and self-correction made. Circle the appropriate letter for the cue used by the student. See the following page (link to Reading a-z.com) for an analyzed running record sample.

The teacher uses the data from the running record to individual instruction for the child in areas indicated as problems.

Terms for Analyzing the Running Record

  • Errors (E)--Errors are tallied during the reading whenever a child does any of the following:

-- Substitutes another word for a word in the text
-- Omits a word
-- Inserts a word
-- Has to be told a word  (Note that the committee recommends “No Tolds” in a formal running

record to determine if the student is able to apply the cueing systems and allow the teacher to .)

  • Self-correction (SC)--Self-correction occurs when a child realizes her or his error and corrects it. When a child makes a self-correction, the previous substitution is not scored as an error.

  • Meaning (M)--Meaning is part of the cueing system in which the child takes her or his cue to make sense of text by thinking about the story background, information from pictures, or the meaning of a sentence. These cues assist in the reading of a word or phrase.

  • Structure (S)--Structure refers to the structure of language and is often referred to as syntax. Implicit knowledge of structure helps the reader know if what she or he reads sounds correct.

  • Visual (V)--Visual information is related to the look of the letters in a word and the word itself. A reader uses visual information when she or he studies the beginning sound, middle or ending sounds, word length, familiar word chunks, and so forth. This is also referred to as the graphophonics cueing system.



To review a sample of an Analyzed Running Record, please use the following link:
http://www.readinga-z.com/


    1. Click on the Assessment tab at the top of Reading A-Z home page.




    1. Go to the sidebar on the right and click on Benchmark Books and Running Records.




    1. Scroll down to the Sample Running Record titled (Reading A-Z - Running Record - Level D)


THE CUEING SYSTEMS


  1. Visual:/graphophonic: Use of letter/sound cues. Students look at the B/M/E of the word for letter and sound cues.

Cueing Questions/Prompts

    • Does it look right?

    • What would you expect to see if that word were _______?

    • What letter would expect to see at the beginning of _________?

    • Look at that word again, think about the sound of the first letter.

    • Do you know a word like that?

    • What else do you know about that word?

    • What do you expect to see at the beginning, the end, after the______?




  1. Syntactic/Structure: The structure of the sentence. Knowledge of language structure. Students use grammar, word order, tense, number, and gender.

Cueing Questions/ Prompts

    • Does it sound right?

    • You said ______. Does that sound right?

    • You might say it that way, but is that the way we would see it in a book?

    • Does that sound like talking?




  1. Semantics/Meaning: The meaning of the message. Previous experience or knowledge of subject matter. Students use pictures, experiences and sense.

Cueing Questions/Prompts

    • Does it make sense?

    • You said ______. Does that make sense?

    • What do you think it might be?

    • Did you check the picture?

    • What is happening in the story?



T
****When analyzing the running record, the teacher indicates the cues the child uses when making an error and/or self correction.
he successful use of all the Cueing Systems creates meaning for the reader.


Running Record Log
Name _______________________________ Grade _________


Date

DRA

Level

Title

Fluency Level

% of Accuracy

VESD/DRA2

Rubric





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Leveling Correlation Table


Wright

Group

Levels

K-1

1-2

2

3

3

4

5

6

EARLY

EMERGENT

UPPER

EMERGENT

EARLY

FLUENCY

FLUENCY

PROFICIENCY

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

Fountas

& Pinnell

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Reading

Recovery

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

20+

20+

22

24

26

27

28







DRA

Levels

A

1

2

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

16

18

20

24

28

30

34

38

40

44













Lexile

Levels

100

200

251

300

301

350

401

450

451

500

501

550

551

600

601

650

651

700

701

750

751

800

801

850

851

900

901

950

951

1000

1001

1050

1051

+

Reading

a-z

aa

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

MNO

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X


Grey boxes indicate grade level overlaps.

The Leveling Correlation Table provides an approximate correlation of the various leveling systems. Teachers are encouraged to adjust these levels according to personal evaluation as they may have leveling characteristics that differ slightly.
Wright Group
Fountas & Pinnell: Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, Matching Books to Readers (Portsmouth, NH, 1999).
Reading Recovery is a registered service mark of Ohio State University.
DRA: Joetta Beaver, Developmental Reading Assessment Resource Guide (Glenview, IL: Celebration Press, 1977).

Lexile Frameworks developed by MetaMetrics, Inc.
Reading a-z (Reading a-z.com)



Story Overviews

Levels 4-44 for

Comprehension/Retelling Purposes


  1. Copy story overview for student




  1. Highlight areas covered by student during retelling




  1. The bottom of the story overviews can be used to make notes on student behaviors



We wish to thank the primary teaching staff at Discovery School of the Arts for writing and graciously providing the committee with the story overviews for district running record use.


Get Your Umbrella - Level 4
Story Overview:
Kim and her Dad are getting ready to walk to school on a rainy day.


  1. Dad told Kim to get her umbrella.




  1. Kim looked in the closet. No umbrella.




  1. Kim looked under the bed. No umbrella.




  1. Kim found her umbrella in the kitchen.




  1. Kim told Dad she got her umbrella.


Ending: Dad told Kim the sun was out (or it had stopped raining).

Where Is My Hat - Level 4
Story Overview:
1. Ben misses hat, looks under the bed, and says, “It is not

here.”
2. Mom looks in closet and says, “It is not here.”
3. Ben looks in his toy box and says, “It is not here.”
4. Mom looks behind a chair and…
Ending: Mom finds had behind the chair with dog lying on it and

says, “Here it is!”

Time to Play – Level 6
Story Overview:
1. Pam and Lee played soccer. Then they did different things

after school. They didn’t have time to play.
2. On Monday, Lee went to art class after school. He had no time

to play with Pam.
3. On Tuesday, Pam went to Grandma’s house after school. She

had no time to play with Lee.
4. On Wednesday, Lee went to the store with his mom.
5. On Thursday. Pam had a soccer game.
Ending: On Friday, Lee and Pam had time to play together.

They had fun.


Why Are We Stopping? – Level 6
Story Overview:
1. Policeman stopped bus.
2. Truck stopped behind bus and the driver said, “Why are we

stopping?”
3. Car stopped behind truck and the driver said, “Why are we

stopping?”
4. Mother and baby ducks went across the street.
5. Policeman said, “Go,” and the bus, the truck, and car went

on…
Ending: Ducks swam in a pond.


The Lost Book – Level 8
Story Overview:
1. The class was going to the library. There were 10 books but

they only had 9 books. The teacher and children looked

for the book.
2. Teacher told children, “We must find the lost book.”
3. Two boys looked under a rug and found one black bug

and one penny but no book.
4. Two girls looked behind a bookcase and found a yellow

ball and some blocks but no book.
5. A boy and girl looked in their backpacks and found no

book.
Ending: The teacher looked under some papers on his desk and

found the book.

Duke – Level 8
Story Overview:
1. Duke is a black and white dog with big feet.
2. He can do lots of tricks.
3. Duke sits up and shakes hands, and Jim says, “Good dog.”
4. Duke jumps over Jim’s arm, and Jim says, “Good dog.”
5. Duke gets the ball, and Jim says “Good dog.”
Ending: Duke keeps Jim clean by licking him.

Grandma’s Surprise – Level 10
Story Overview:


  1. One morning Mom decided to make a surprise lunch for Grandma. They all said yes.




  1. Ben and Dad made soup because Grandma loves soup.


3. Rose made a picture of three little kittens because

Grandma loves kittens.
4. Mom put purple and yellow flowers in a tall vase because

grandma loves flowers.
5. They all went to Grandma’s house.
6. They gave Grandma the soup, flowers and picture.
Ending: Grandma surprised them with an apple pie.

Shoe Boxes – Level 10
Story Overview:
Beginning
1. Mandy and her brother and sister got new shoes.
Middle
2. Mandy’s brother got new soccer shoes.

3. He then puts a caterpillar in his red shoe box with white stripes.

4. Mandy’s sister gets new baseball shoes.

5. She puts baseball cards and the string in her blue shoe box.

6. Mandy gets new blue birthday shoes.
Ending:
7. She gave her green show box with flowers on it to her baby sister.

8. Her baby sister sits on Mandy’s shoebox.

Allie’s Wish – Level 12
Story Overview:
1. Allie wished she had a pet of her own. She helped other

people take care of their pets.
2. On Mondays, Allie helped Lee take care of his dog. She

loved his dog.
3. On Wednesdays, Allie helped Sam take care of his bird.

She loved the bird.
4. On Fridays, Allie brushed and played with Mrs. May’s cat.
5. Allie and her dad went to see Mrs. May’s cat.
6. Mrs. May’s cat had kittens, and she asked Allie if she’d like

to have one.
Ending: Allie asked her dad if she could have a kitten. He said,

“Yes.” Allie had her own pet to take care of.

Robert’s New Friend – Level 12
Story Overview:


  1. Robert isn’t sure he likes his new baby sister Maria

because she cries.
2. Mama’s giving Maria a bath-can’t play with Robert;

Robert feels left out because Mama is busy taking care of

Maria.
3. Papa’s feeding Maria-can’t read to Robert; Robert feels

left out because Papa is bust taking care of Maria.


  1. One day Mama can’t stop Maria from crying.




  1. Robert puts his finger in Maria’s hand and she stops crying.


Ending: Robert decides he likes Maria and tells Mama he will help

take care of Maria, too.

A New School – Level 14
Story Overview:
1. Kate and her family moved into a new house, and in the morning she

would go to a new school. She wondered if she would like her new

school and have any friends.
2. Kate’s father took her to her new classroom.


  1. Kate sat next to the teacher as she read a story to the class. Kate liked

The story, but she wasn’t sure whether she would like the school.
4. At reading time, two boys read with Kate on a rug. Kate felt a little better,

but she still wasn’t sure whether she would like her new school.
5. At math time, a boy and a girl made pictures out of shapes together with

Kate. They had fun. They boy made a bird, the girl made a dog and Kate

made a house.


  1. At lunch time, a girl gave a cookie to Kate. She was starting to like her

new school.
Ending: After school, Kate walked home with her mother. She told about her

new friends. She liked her new school.

The Wagon – Level 14
Story Overview:
1. Kevin’s big brother gets a new wagon; he carries newspapers in

it-but Kevin never gets to ride in it.
2. Brother gives it to sister; she uses it for a sandbox-but Kevin gets

to ride in it.
3. Sister gives it to their other brother; he uses it for a fort-but Kevin

never gets to ride in it.
4. Brother gives wagon to Kevin; wagon is old and dirty and has

dents in it.
5. Brothers and sister wash the wagon, take out the dents, and

paint it bright green.
Ending: The wagon looks better than new because they’ve painted

Kevin’s name on it.

Animal Homes – Level 16
Story Overview:
1. Some animals make their homes in trees (squirrels, wasps, raccoons,

birds). Squirrels use twigs and leaves to build a nest.


  1. Some animals make their homes under the ground (rabbits, ants,

chipmunks). Rabbits use their paws to dig tunnels and make rooms in the

ground.
3. Some animals build their homes in the water (beaver, fish, alligators),

Beavers use sticks and mud to make their homes in the water.
4. Some animals make their homes in caves (bats, sea lions, bears). Bats

hang upside down in dark caves to sleep.
5. Some animals make their homes in logs (porcupines, snakes, snails).

Porcupines put grass in logs to make homes for their babies.

Baby Birds – Level 16
Overview:


  1. Birds make nests in the spring. Robins make round nest from mud, twigs, leaves, and grass.




  1. Birds lay Birds make nests in the spring. Robins make round nest from mud, twigs, leaves, and grass.




  1. Birds keep their eggs warm. Mother robbing keeps her eggs warm by sitting on the nest for about 13 days. She turns the eggs every day.




  1. Baby birds then hatch from the eggs. Baby robins use their beaks to crack open the eggshells.




  1. The babies cannot fly. They don’t have feathers, and they cannot see.




  1. Mother and father birds feed the babies. Robins feed their babies worms and bugs for about 35 meals a day.




  1. Baby birds grow. Baby robins grow feathers, and their eyes open.




  1. In about 14 days, baby robins leave the nest and learn to fly.


Chip to the Rescue – Level 16
Story Overview:
Beginning:

1. Chip the mouse and Dot the giraffe were good friends.
2. Some giraffes did not know why Chip and Dot were friends.
3. The giraffes thought Chip can’t do anything because he is small.
Middle:

4. The giraffes went kite flying and Dot asked Chip to go.
5. The kites flew high in the sky.
6. The wind blew so hard that the kits got stuck in some trees.
7. The giraffes were sad. They could not get the kites out of the trees,
8. Chip got the kite strings out of the branches.
9. The giraffes cheered for Chip.
Ending:

10. Chip could do things the giraffes can’t do because he is small.


Monkey’s Stepping Stones – Level 16
Story Overview:
Beginning:

1. Monkey took a walk to look for butterflies.
2. Mother told Monkey not to go far. Lots of animals eat monkeys.
Middle:

3. Monkey saw a purple butterfly and followed it deep into the jungle.
4. He came to a river and used the hippos as stepping stones to walk

across the river.
5. He saw the purple butterfly again.
6. All of a sudden, Monkey saw a tiger!
7. He ran to the river, but the hippos were gone.
8. Bird told Monkey to use the vine, but the vine was too short.
9. Hippos popped out of the water, and Monkey used the hippos as

stepping stones.
Ending:

10. Monkey was safe on the other side of the river, and he went home.


The Pot of Gold – Level 16
Story Overview:
1. Grumble sees elf – and remembers elf has the gold.
2. Grumble catches the elf. The elf says, “Let me go.”


  1. Grumble says, “Take me to your pot of gold and then I’ll let you go.”




  1. Elf takes Grumble to a big tree and tells him, “You’ll have to dig deep to get it.”




  1. Grumble marks tree with red scarf.




  1. He makes the elf promise not to take the red scarf off.




  1. He runs home and gets a shovel.




  1. He comes back and finds a red scarf on every tree.




  1. Grumble begins to yell and scream and stomp his fee.


Ending: Grumble begins digging and “may still be digging.”

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