Registration statement pursuant to section 12(b) or (g) of the securities exchange act of 1934




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Risks Related to Ownership of our Ordinary Shares

We cannot predict what the market price of our ordinary shares will be. As a result it may be difficult for you to sell your ordinary shares at or above the price at which you purchased them.

An active trading market for our shares may not be sustained. The market value of our ordinary shares may decrease from time to time. As a result of these and other factors, you may be unable to resell your shares at or above the price at which you purchased them. The lack of an active market may impair your ability to sell your shares at the time you wish to sell them or at a price that you consider reasonable. The lack of an active market may also reduce the fair market value of your shares. Further, an inactive market may also impair our ability to raise capital by selling our ordinary shares and may impair our ability to enter into strategic partnerships or acquire companies or products by using our ordinary shares as consideration. The market price of our shares may be volatile and you could lose all or part of your investment.

The trading price of our ordinary shares is likely to be highly volatile and could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control. For example, the price of our ordinary shares, which reached its high record of $24.99 per share at the close of the trading on March 10, 2015, decreased as low as $2.80 per share at the close of the trading on December 12, 2017. In addition to the factors discussed in this “Risk Factors” section and elsewhere in this annual report, these factors include:

 

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the presentation of data at industry conferences by us and/or our competitors;




 

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the responses to any of our IND applications with the FDA and any of our CTA applications with the EMA;




 

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any current or future pre-clinical or clinical trials of our product candidates, including any delays in enrollment rates or timing of these trials;




 

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regulatory actions with respect to our products or our competitors’ products;




 

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the recruitment or departure of key personnel;




 

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announcements by us or our competitors of significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures, collaborations or capital commitments;




 

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results of clinical trials of our competitors;




 

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the success of competitive products or technologies;




 

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actual or anticipated changes in our growth rate relative to our competitors;




 

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regulatory or legal developments in the United States, the European Union and other jurisdictions;

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developments or disputes concerning patent applications, issued patents or other proprietary rights;




 

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the level of expenses related to any of our product candidates or pre-clinical or clinical development programs;




 

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actual or anticipated changes in estimates as to financial results, development timelines or recommendations by securities analysts;




 

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variations in our financial results or those of companies that are perceived to be similar to us;




 

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fluctuations in the valuation of companies perceived by investors to be comparable to us;




 

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share price and volume fluctuations attributable to inconsistent trading volume levels of our shares;




 

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announcement or expectation of additional financing efforts;




 

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sales of our ordinary shares by us, our insiders or our other shareholders;




 

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changes in the structure of healthcare payment systems;




 

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market conditions in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors; and




 

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general economic, industry and market conditions.

In addition, the stock market in general, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies in particular, have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have sometimes been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of these companies. Broad market and industry factors may negatively affect the market price of our ordinary shares, regardless of our actual operating performance. The realization of any of the above risks or any of a broad range of other risks, including those described in these “Risk Factors,” could have a dramatic and material adverse impact on the market price of our ordinary shares.

If securities or industry analysts publish inaccurate or unfavorable research or cease to publish research about our business, our share price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our ordinary shares depends in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. In the event securities or industry analysts who cover us downgrade our ordinary shares, publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, or cease publishing about us, our share price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our ordinary shares could decrease, which might cause our share price and trading volume to decline.

Sales of a substantial number of our ordinary shares by our existing shareholders in the public market could cause our share price to fall.

If our existing shareholders sell, or indicate an intention to sell, substantial amounts of our ordinary shares in the public market, the trading price of our ordinary shares could decline. In addition, a substantial number of ordinary shares subject to outstanding options are or will become eligible for sale in the public market to the extent permitted by the provisions of various vesting schedules. If these additional ordinary shares are sold, or if it is perceived that they will be sold, in the public market, the trading price of our ordinary shares could decline.

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If we sell shares of our common stock in future financings, stockholders may experience immediate dilution and, as a result, our stock price may decline.

We may from time to time issue additional shares of our common stock or securities convertible into our common stock, including in future financings that we may undertake. In October 2015, we filed a shelf registration statement on Form F 3, pursuant to which we may issue and sell ordinary shares, warrants and units (or any combination of the foregoing) in one or more transactions up to a maximum value of $200.0 million. In addition, in October 2015, we entered into an agreement for an at-the-market offering facility, or ATM facility, pursuant to which we may issue shares of our common stock from time to time under our shelf registration statement up to a maximum of $60.0 million. If we issue additional shares of our common stock or securities convertible into common stock, including pursuant to our shelf registration statement or our ATM facility, our stockholders may experience immediate dilution and, as a result, our stock price may decline.

Members of our management board and supervisory board and our principal shareholders and their affiliates have significant control over our company, which will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could delay or prevent a change in corporate control.

The holdings of the members of our management board and supervisory board and our principal shareholders and their affiliates, represent significant ownership, in the aggregate, of our outstanding ordinary shares (as set out in “Item 7.A. Major Shareholders”). As a result, these shareholders, if they act together, will be able to influence our management and affairs and control the outcome of matters submitted to our shareholders for approval, including the election of members of our management board and supervisory board and any sale, merger, consolidation, or sale of all or substantially all of our assets. These shareholders may have interests, with respect to their ordinary shares, that are different from other investors and the concentration of voting power among these shareholders may have an adverse effect on the price of our ordinary shares. In addition, this concentration of ownership might adversely affect the market price of our ordinary shares by:

 

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delaying, deferring or preventing a change of control of our Company;




 

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impeding a merger, consolidation, takeover or other business combination involving our Company; or




 

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discouraging a potential acquirer from making a tender offer or otherwise attempting to obtain control of our Company.

Please see “Item 7.A. Major Shareholders” for more information regarding the ownership of our outstanding ordinary shares by our management board and supervisory board and our principal shareholders and their affiliates.

Because we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our ordinary shares in the foreseeable future, capital appreciation, if any, will be your sole source of potential gain.

We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our ordinary shares. We currently intend to retain all of our future earnings, if any, to finance the growth and development of our business. In addition, the terms of any future debt agreements may preclude us from paying dividends. As a result, capital appreciation, if any, of our ordinary shares will be your sole source of gain for the foreseeable future.

We are an “emerging growth company” and we intend to take advantage of reduced disclosure and governance requirements applicable to emerging growth companies, which could result in our ordinary shares being less attractive to investors.

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and we are taking advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and, in case we become a domestic filer, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements

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of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We do not know if investors will find our ordinary shares less attractive because we are relying on these exemptions. We may take advantage of these reporting exemptions until we are no longer an emerging growth company, which could be for up to five years after our initial public offering in September 2014.

If investors find our ordinary shares less attractive as a result of our reduced reporting requirements, there may be a less active trading market for our ordinary shares and our share price may be more volatile. We may also be unable to raise additional capital as and when we need it.

We have been a listed company since September 2014, and therefore, have a limited history operating as a public company and complying with public company obligations. Complying with all requirements, particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company” that enjoys reduced requirements, will increase our costs, require additional management resources and qualified accounting and financial personnel, and we may fail to meet all of these obligations.

We face increased legal, accounting, administrative and other costs and expenses as a public company. Compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010, the Dutch Financial Supervision Act and the rules promulgated thereunder, as well as rules of the SEC and NASDAQ and the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, or DCGC, for example, are expected to result in ongoing increases in our legal, audit and financial compliance costs, particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” The Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, requires, among other things, that we file certain periodic reports with respect to our business and financial condition. Our management board, officers and other personnel need to devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. We expect to incur significant expense and devote substantial management effort toward ensuring compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 in preparation for and once we lose our status as an “emerging growth company.” We currently do not have an internal audit group, and we will need to continue to hire additional accounting and financial staff with appropriate public company experience and technical accounting knowledge, and it may be difficult to recruit and maintain such personnel. Implementing any appropriate changes to our internal controls may require specific compliance training for our directors, officers and employees, entail substantial costs to modify our existing accounting systems, and take a significant period of time to complete. Such changes may not, however, be effective in maintaining the adequacy of our internal controls, and any failure to maintain that adequacy, or consequent inability to produce accurate financial statements or other reports on a timely basis, could increase our operating costs and could materially impair our ability to operate our business.

If we fail to establish and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud. As a result, shareholders could lose confidence in our financial and other public reporting, which would harm our business and the trading price of our ordinary shares.

Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and, together with adequate disclosure controls and procedures, are designed to prevent fraud. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation could cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. In addition, any testing by us conducted in connection with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or any subsequent testing by our independent registered public accounting firm, may reveal deficiencies in our internal controls over financial reporting that are deemed to be material weaknesses or that may require prospective or retroactive changes to our financial statements or identify other areas for further attention or improvement. Inferior internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our ordinary shares.

Our management board will be required to assess the effectiveness of our internal controls and procedures annually and, in case we become a domestic filer, we will be required to disclose changes to these controls on a quarterly basis.  However, for as long as we are an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404. We could be an “emerging growth company” for up to five years. An independent assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls could detect problems that our management’s assessment might not.

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Undetected material weaknesses in our internal controls could lead to financial statement restatements and require us to incur the expense of remediation.

Our disclosure controls and procedures may not prevent or detect all errors or acts of fraud.

We are subject to certain reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to reasonably assure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC. We believe that any disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls and procedures, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people or by an unauthorized override of the controls. Accordingly, because of the inherent limitations in our control system, misstatements or insufficient disclosures due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.
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