Schedule 14A




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Executive officers and non-employee directors must retain 100% of the net number of shares of common stock acquired (after payment of exercise price, if any, and taxes) upon the exercise of stock options and the vesting of restricted stock or restricted stock units granted until they achieve compliance with the applicable guideline. Once achieved, ownership of the guideline amount must be maintained for as long as the executive officers and non-employee directors are subject to the Ownership Guidelines. Executive officers and non-employee directors who do not comply with the Ownership Guidelines may not be eligible for future equity awards. If an executive officer or non-employee director falls below the required ownership threshold, he or she will be prohibited from selling shares of Company common stock until he or she meets the ownership thresholds.

Anti-Hedging and Anti-Pledging Policy

The Company’s anti-hedging and anti-pledging policy (the “Anti-Hedging and Anti-Pledging Policy”) prohibits directors and officers from directly or indirectly engaging in hedging against future declines in the market value of the Company’s securities through the purchase of financial instruments designed to offset such risk and from pledging the Company’s securities as collateral for margin and other loans. The Compensation Committee considers it improper and inappropriate for directors and officers of the Company to hedge transactions to mitigate the impact of changes in the value of the Company’s securities. Similarly, placing the Company’s securities in a margin account or pledging them as collateral may result in their being sold without the director or officer’s consent or at a time when the director or officer is in possession of material nonpublic information of the Company. When any of these types of transactions occurs, the director’s or officer’s incentives and objectives may be less closely aligned with those of the Company’s other shareholders, and the director’s or officer’s incentive to improve the Company’s performance may be (or may appear to be) compromised.

Under the Anti-Hedging and Anti-Pledging Policy, no director or officer may, directly or indirectly, engage in any hedging transaction that reduces or limits the director’s or officer’s economic risk with respect to the director’s or officer’s holdings, ownership or interest in the Company’s securities, including outstanding stock

 

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options, stock appreciation rights or other compensation awards the value of which are derived from, referenced to or based on the value or market price of the Company’s securities.

Prohibited transactions include the purchase by a director or officer of financial instruments, including, without limitation, prepaid variable forward contracts, equity swaps, collars, puts, calls or other derivative securities that are designed to hedge or offset a change in market value of the Company’s securities, as well as any transaction that places the Company’s securities in a margin account or pledges them as collateral for loans or other obligations.

Compensation Risk Analysis 

The Compensation Committee is responsible for overseeing our incentive compensation arrangements, for aligning such arrangements with sound risk management and long-term growth and for verifying compliance with applicable regulations. The Compensation Committee conducted an internal assessment of our executive and non-executive incentive compensation programs, policies and practices. The Compensation Committee reviewed and discussed: the various design features and characteristics of the Company-wide compensation policies and programs; performance metrics; and approval mechanisms of all incentive programs. Based on this assessment and after discussion with management and Cook & Co., the Compensation Committee has concluded that our incentive compensation arrangements and practices do not create risks that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the Company.

Recoupment Provisions

The Company may recover any incentive compensation awarded or paid pursuant to an incentive plan based on (i) achievement of financial results that were subsequently the subject of a restatement due to material noncompliance with any financial reporting requirement under either GAAP or the federal securities laws, other than as a result of changes to accounting rules and regulations, or (ii) a subsequent finding that the financial information or performance metrics used by the Compensation Committee to determine the amount of the incentive compensation were materially inaccurate, in each case regardless of individual fault. In addition, the Company may recover any incentive compensation awarded or paid pursuant to any incentive plan based on a participant’s conduct which is not in good faith and which materially disrupts, damages, impairs or interferes with the business of the Company and its affiliates.

Impact of Tax and Accounting Treatments on Compensation

Although the accounting and tax treatment of executive compensation generally has not been a factor in the Compensation Committee’s decisions regarding the amounts of compensation paid to our executive officers, it has been a factor in the compensation mix as well as the design of compensation programs. We have attempted to structure our compensation to maximize the tax benefits to the Company (e.g., deductibility for tax purposes) and to appropriately reward performance. The accounting treatment of differing forms of equity awards presently used to compensate our executives varies. However, the accounting treatment is not expected to have a material effect on the Compensation Committee’s selection of differing types of equity awards.

Sections 280G and 4999

As described above, we provide our Named Executive Officers (other than Ms. Cochran) with management retention agreements. These agreements provide for severance payments following a termination in connection with a change in control of the Company under certain circumstances. None of our Named Executive Officers has a right under these management retention agreements or otherwise to receive any gross-up payment to reimburse such executive officer for any excise tax under Sections 280G and 4999 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”).

 

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Section 162(m)

Section 162(m) of the Code imposes a $1.0 million limit on the amount a public company may deduct for compensation paid to its Chief Executive Officer or any of our four other most highly compensated executive officers (excluding our Chief Financial Officer, who the Internal Revenue Service has indicated may be excluded) who are employed by the Company as of the end of the fiscal year. However, the limit described in Section 162(m) does not apply to compensation that satisfies the requirements of Section 162(m) for “qualifying performance-based” compensation. The Compensation Committee attempts to maximize deductibility of compensation under Section 162(m) to the extent practicable while maintaining a competitive, performance-based compensation program. However, the Compensation Committee also believes that it must (and does) reserve the right to award compensation which it deems to be in the best interests of the Company and our shareholders, but which may not be fully tax deductible under Section 162(m).

The Company intends for payments under the annual bonus plan to qualify as “performance based” compensation under Section 162(m) of the Code. For 2016, the Compensation Committee approved the establishment of the bonus pool which is funded based on the achievement of operating income. If the Company achieved an operating income of less than $200.0 million, then the bonus pool would not fund and no payouts would be made under the bonus plan. Actual bonus payments to individual executives are based on the achievement of performance criteria set forth under “Elements of Compensation Program—Annual Bonus Plan,” on page 19 of this proxy statement.

Likewise, the Company also intends for awards made under its various long-term incentive plans to qualify as “performance based” compensation under Section 162(m) of the Code to the maximum extent permitted under the 2010 Omnibus Plan. As with the annual bonus plan, eligibility to receive awards under the long-term incentive plans is dependent upon the Company’s operating income performance during the applicable performance period. For the 2016 MSU Grant, the operating income threshold is $525.0 million over the three-year performance period, and for the 2016 LTPP, the operating income threshold is $350.0 million over the two-year performance period. If these operating income performance goals are not met, then no award will be made under the applicable plan to any executive officer participating in the plan. If, however, the applicable operating income performance goal is met, then each participant in the applicable plan will become eligible to receive an equity award determined according to the performance criteria described under “Elements of Compensation Program—Long-Term Incentives,” above.

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE REPORT

The Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed with management the Compensation Discussion and Analysis (“CD&A”) included in this proxy statement. Based on its review and discussions of the CD&A with management, the Compensation Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the CD&A be included in this proxy statement and incorporated by reference into our Annual Report on Form 10-K for 2016.

This report has been submitted by the members of the Compensation Committee:

Coleman H. Peterson, Chair

Glenn A. Davenport

William W. McCarten

Andrea M. Weiss

 

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COMPENSATION TABLESAND INFORMATION

Summary Compensation Table

The following table sets forth information regarding the compensation for the Named Executive Officers during 2014, 2015 and 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name and Principal Position

 

Year

 

 

Salary

 

 

Stock

Awards(1)

 

 

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan

Compensation

 

 

All Other

Compensation(2)

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

Sandra B. Cochran,

 

 

2016

  

 

$

1,025,000

  

 

$

3,804,236

  

 

$

1,163,693

  

 

$

606,351

  

 

$

6,599,280

  

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

 

2015

  

 

$

985,000

  

 

$

4,021,275

  

 

$

1,851,702

  

 

$

463,868

  

 

$

7,321,845

  

 

 

 

2014

  

 

$

955,000

  

 

$

3,624,745

  

 

$

898,369

  

 

$

146,846

  

 

$

5,624,960

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jill Golder,

 

 

2016

  

 

$

128,646

(3) 

 

$

570,187

  

 

$

92,943

  

 

$

30,669

  

 

$

822,445

  

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial

Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lawrence E. Hyatt,

 

 

2016

  

 

$

495,300

(4) 

 

$

408,760

  

 

$

354,813

(4) 

 

$

171,335

  

 

$

1,430,208

  

Former Senior Vice President and Chief Financial

 

 

2015

  

 

$

520,000

  

 

$

908,010

  

 

$

684,284

  

 

$

126,039

  

 

$

2,238,333

  

Officer

 

 

2014

  

 

$

505,000

  

 

$

945,253

  

 

$

332,538

  

 

$

32,583

  

 

$

1,815,374

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicholas V. Flanagan,

 

 

2016

  

 

$

445,000

  

 

$

446,365

  

 

$

321,499

  

 

$

85,332

  

 

$

1,298,196

  

Senior Vice President, Operations

 

 

2015

  

 

$

426,000

  

 

$

469,991

  

 

$

560,586

  

 

$

55,132

  

 

$

1,511,709

  

 

 

 

2014

  

 

$

370,000

  

 

$

309,760

  

 

$

208,835

  

 

$

13,499

  

 

$

902,094

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beverly K. Carmichael,

 

 

2016

  

 

$

345,000

  

 

$

224,847

  

 

$

195,841

  

 

$

59,890

  

 

$

825,578

  

Senior Vice President, Chief People Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laura A. Daily,

 

 

2016

  

 

$

320,000

  

 

$

192,466

  

 

$

181,650

  

 

$

41,200

  

 

$

735,316

  

Senior Vice President, Retail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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